CHOMSKY FOUCAULT DEBATE TRANSCRIPT PDF

The moral relativist believes that moral principles are relative to some group, such as a society or a class. This led to some conflict during the Raj. There are no universal or objec Continue Reading Loading… The disagreements between Foucault and Chomsky were several but the most fundamental, it seems to me, is that Foucault was a moral relativist whereas Chomsky is a moral realist.

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The moral relativist believes that moral principles are relative to some group, such as a society or a class. This led to some conflict during the Raj. There are no universal or objec Continue Reading Loading… The disagreements between Foucault and Chomsky were several but the most fundamental, it seems to me, is that Foucault was a moral relativist whereas Chomsky is a moral realist. That is what the moral realist denies, in favor of the view that universal standards of conduct do exist and, although this is another step, that they can be discovered and formulated by reasoning about them.

As a corollary to the thesis that morality is relative to a group, the moral relativist denies that there are moral facts. There are only social expectations, values, practices, and facts about them. So it would not be true to say of Betty, who promised Sue that she would meet her for lunch today, that she is obligated to do so in the sense that she should keep her promise because that is the right thing to do. If that were the consequence of the proletariat taking power, of course it would not be appropriate.

How else should we decide? The proletariat makes war with the ruling class because, for the first time in history, it wants to take power. And because it will overthrow the power of the ruling class it considers such a war to be just. Because there are no moral facts. Any number of revolutionaries have argued so. But it seems to me that … the notion of justice itself functions within a society of classes as a claim made by the oppressed class and as justification for it.

Foucault is saying that in a perfectly just society, there would be no need for a concept of justice. But how is that relevant to the question of whether justice is real or relative? And how could we tell whether a classless society was perfectly just, without a concept of justice?

As Foucault perceptively points out at the end of the discussion, he and Chomsky had relatively little trouble finding common ground on the topic of human nature, but their views on politics were irreconcilable. Chomsky associates human nature with innate cognitive structures, whereas Foucault believes that human nature is something like an ideology.

My particular interest … is with the intrinsic capacities of the mind; yours, as you say, is in the particular arrangement of social and economic and other conditions. At least, that is how the difference between our points of view appeared to me.

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Human Nature: Justice versus Power

In the video recording Content of the transcript differs from the actual recording. Large, yellow English subtitles are burned-in over the original Dutch subtitles. The complete video recording of the program includes opening credits, an introduction by Prof. Nauta, the entrance of Noam Chomsky and Michel Foucault, the debate itself moderated by Dutch philosopher Fons Elders , a period of discussion with the audience and end credits. It was uploaded by user withDefiance on Feb. The video embedded above was updated accordingly.

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Chomsky–Foucault debate

Leave a Comment What is our role in social justice as applied sociologists? Chomsky believes that the social sciences should draw up a framework for an ideal society where creativity, freedom and scientific discovery will flourish. He sees it is our task to help to put this plan into action. Foucault argues that there is no ideal concept of social justice that can be universally applied. Applied sociologists work with policy and community organisations to affect justice organisations and practices. Foucault says: …one of the tasks that seems immediate and urgent to me, over and above anything else, is this: that we should indicate and show up, even where they are hidden, all the relationships of political power which actually control the social body and oppress or repress it.

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